Enable GodMode in Windows 7

Windows 7’s so-called GodMode is actually a shortcut to
accessing the operating system’s various control settings.

Although its name suggests perhaps even grander capabilities, Windows
enthusiasts are excited over the discovery of a hidden “GodMode” feature that
lets users access all of the operating system’s control panels from within a
single folder.

By creating a new folder in Windows 7 and renaming it with a certain text string at
the end, users are able to have a single place to do everything from changing
the look of the mouse pointer to making a new hard-drive partition.

Enable ‘GodMode’ in Windows 7

To enter “GodMode,” one need only create a new folder and then rename the
folder to the following:

GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

Once that is done, the folder’s icon will change to resemble a control panel
and will contain dozens of control options.

 

 

Anonymous Browsing with TOR Windows 7

What is Tor?

Tor is free software and an open network that helps you defend against a form of network surveillance that threatens personal freedom and privacy, confidential business activities and relationships, and state security known as traffic analysis.

Why Anonymity Matters

Tor protects you by bouncing your communications around a distributed network of relays run by volunteers all around the world: it prevents somebody watching your Internet connection from learning what sites you visit, and it prevents the sites you visit from learning your physical location. Tor works with many of your existing applications, including web browsers, instant messaging clients, remote login, and other applications based on the TCP protocol.

Why we need tor

Using Tor protects you against a common form of Internet surveillance known as “traffic analysis.” Traffic analysis can be used to infer who is talking to whom over a public network. Knowing the source and destination of your Internet traffic allows others to track your behavior and interests. This can impact your checkbook if, for example, an e-commerce site uses price discrimination based on your country or institution of origin. It can even threaten your job and physical safety by revealing who and where you are. For example, if you’re travelling abroad and you connect to your employer’s computers to check or send mail, you can inadvertently reveal your national origin and professional affiliation to anyone observing the network, even if the connection is encrypted.

How does traffic analysis work? Internet data packets have two parts: a data payload and a header used for routing. The data payload is whatever is being sent, whether that’s an email message, a web page, or an audio file. Even if you encrypt the data payload of your communications, traffic analysis still reveals a great deal about what you’re doing and, possibly, what you’re saying. That’s because it focuses on the header, which discloses source, destination, size, timing, and so on.

A basic problem for the privacy minded is that the recipient of your communications can see that you sent it by looking at headers. So can authorized intermediaries like Internet service providers, and sometimes unauthorized intermediaries as well. A very simple form of traffic analysis might involve sitting somewhere between sender and recipient on the network, looking at headers.

But there are also more powerful kinds of traffic analysis. Some attackers spy on multiple parts of the Internet and use sophisticated statistical techniques to track the communications patterns of many different organizations and individuals. Encryption does not help against these attackers, since it only hides the content of Internet traffic, not the headers.

Staying anonymous

Tor can’t solve all anonymity problems. It focuses only on protecting the transport of data. You need to use protocol-specific support software if you don’t want the sites you visit to see your identifying information. For example, you can use Torbutton while browsing the web to withhold some information about your computer’s configuration.

Also, to protect your anonymity, be smart. Don’t provide your name or other revealing information in web forms. Be aware that, like all anonymizing networks that are fast enough for web browsing, Tor does not provide protection against end-to-end timing attacks: If your attacker can watch the traffic coming out of your computer, and also the traffic arriving at your chosen destination, he can use statistical analysis to discover that they are part of the same circuit.

Configuring Windows 7 to browse with TOR:

1. Go to website of tor project; https://www.torproject.org/

2. Clik to Download stable TOR;

3. Click to open downloaded .exe file, to start the setup;

4. When install leave default “FULL” instalation;

5.  Open the new installed program “VIDALIA”  and click on “Start Tor”

In 10-15 second you will be connected to TOR;

6. If you have some problem with default TorButton, check this;

Go to https://www.torproject.org/torbutton/ and install the stable TorButton; Firefox 5.0!

7. When TorButton install is finish, restart Firefox an you’ll see the new TorButton;

8. Click to this new button and choose “Toggle Tor Status”;

The Tor is now enabled in your browser, you see the green color on the TorButton;

9. Now TOR is started, as you can see on step 5. and you enable the tor for your browser “Firefox” with TorButton.

Now you can start your browsing through the internet and change your identity bi clicking “Use a New Identity” to change your IP address.

Every time you click on “Use a New Identity” you will get the different IP Address in Firefox, if  TOR is enabled.

If you want to test your IP Address, go to http://www.whatismyip.com/ and you will see, what is your current IP Address when you browsing through the internet with your Firefox Browser.

For more information; https://www.torproject.org/

Disable NetBIOS over TCP/IP in Windows 7 ent.

NetBIOS over TCP/IP (NBT, or sometimes NetBT) is a networking protocol that allows legacy computer applications relying on the NetBIOS API to be used on modern TCP/IP networks.

NetBIOS was developed in the early 1980s, targeting very small networks (about a dozen computers). Some applications still use NetBIOS, and do not scale well in today’s networks of hundreds of computers when NetBIOS is run over NBF. When properly configured, NBT allows those applications to be run on large TCP/IP networks (including the whole Internet, although that is likely to be subject to security problems) without change.

NetBIOS provides three distinct services:

  • Name service for name registration and resolution (port: 137)
  • Datagram distribution service for connectionless communication (port: 138)
  • Session service for connection-oriented communication (port: 139)

If you want disable NetBIOS over TCP/IP you take the following steps:

1. Right click to your network interface at the right down corner:

2. Choose “Open Network And Sharing Center”

3. Next click to “Change Adapter Settings”

4. Right click on your network adapter and choose “Properties”

5.  On your network adapter click to “Internet Protocol Version 4” and Properties.

6. When you open the “Properties” you hit on button “Advanced”

7. When you click to Advanced button, Windows will open “Advanced TCP/IP Settings”

In that last window you click on “WINS” tab and then choose “Disable NetBIOS over TCP/IP”

And NetBIOS over TCP/IP is Disabled.